The political betrayal of the army

I felt almost sick reading this blog post in the Telegraph about the breakdown in relationship between the British military and local Iraqi forces.

The short-termism in Gordon Brown’s government has created a situation where the troops in Iraq can no longer do their job but are still at risk from daily attacks.

The appalling result of political triangulation means that Brown won’t withdraw British troops for fear of upsetting our American allies but won’t let the army do its job for fear of casualties. This limbo is demoralising and dangerous. For the Labour government to have squandered years the army’s of “hearts and minds” work in Basra is disgusting.

We must not let the faltering economy and the local government elections lose sight of the terrible betrayal committed against the army. Men and women risk, and even give their lives in support of a government which doesn’t understand them, care about them or support them.

6 responses to “The political betrayal of the army

  1. James – these people not only have no understanding of military requirementsm they can’t even decide on a strategy and then act on it.Armies work best when there is a clear objective – and don’t spare the horses getting there.

  2. James – these people not only have no understanding of military requirementsm they can’t even decide on a strategy and then act on it.Armies work best when there is a clear objective – and don’t spare the horses getting there.

  3. The short-termism in Gordon Brown’s government has created a situation where the troops in Iraq can no longer do their job but are still at risk from daily attacks.This has been evident form the words go. On military flaksuits I ran a post and it was clear that this was a case of shoddy is good enough for the forces.

  4. The short-termism in Gordon Brown’s government has created a situation where the troops in Iraq can no longer do their job but are still at risk from daily attacks.This has been evident form the words go. On military flaksuits I ran a post and it was clear that this was a case of shoddy is good enough for the forces.

  5. An army spokesman on Channel 4 news yesterday gave a very good account of why US forces were used in the operation AS WELL AS British forces.The problem with commenting on comments on comments made by unnamed sources within the army is that the full picture is missed. < HREF="http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/robert_fox/2008/04/in_basra_without_a_paddle.html" REL="nofollow">The Guardian comment<> gives us a few more details:“Hundreds of American military personnel and ‘advisers’ have been ordered into Basra where the American command believes British security policies have failed.”“Some 140 troops from the 1st Battalion, the Royal Scottish Regiment, have also been sent back into the city as mentors and trainers.”“To effect withdrawal without a bloodbath, it is now known that local British commanders cut a deal with leaders of the Mahdi army, among others, which appears to have involved the release of some prisoners.”The British position was compromised when commanders on the ground did deals with local militias, leaving the Iraqi forces to pick up the pieces a few months later – no wonder the Iraqis are pissed off with the British commanders. However, contrary to reports, British soldiers are back in Basra support Iraqi forces (hopefully the right ones this time).Turning a breakdown in a relationship between local commanders into a ‘political betrayal’ is playing Politics with our troops and understating the role that they continue to play in Iraq.I’m still not clear whether you our troops home now or patrolling the streets of Basra – which should it be? While they are still in Iraq you should stop blowing out of proportion each little grumble from an unnamed source in the army, it is bad enough when they are scared on the streets of < HREF="http://jamescleverly.blogspot.com/2008/03/wrong-answer-from-raf.html" REL="nofollow">Peterborough<>.

  6. An army spokesman on Channel 4 news yesterday gave a very good account of why US forces were used in the operation AS WELL AS British forces.The problem with commenting on comments on comments made by unnamed sources within the army is that the full picture is missed. < HREF="http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/robert_fox/2008/04/in_basra_without_a_paddle.html" REL="nofollow">The Guardian comment<> gives us a few more details:“Hundreds of American military personnel and ‘advisers’ have been ordered into Basra where the American command believes British security policies have failed.”“Some 140 troops from the 1st Battalion, the Royal Scottish Regiment, have also been sent back into the city as mentors and trainers.”“To effect withdrawal without a bloodbath, it is now known that local British commanders cut a deal with leaders of the Mahdi army, among others, which appears to have involved the release of some prisoners.”The British position was compromised when commanders on the ground did deals with local militias, leaving the Iraqi forces to pick up the pieces a few months later – no wonder the Iraqis are pissed off with the British commanders. However, contrary to reports, British soldiers are back in Basra support Iraqi forces (hopefully the right ones this time).Turning a breakdown in a relationship between local commanders into a ‘political betrayal’ is playing Politics with our troops and understating the role that they continue to play in Iraq.I’m still not clear whether you our troops home now or patrolling the streets of Basra – which should it be? While they are still in Iraq you should stop blowing out of proportion each little grumble from an unnamed source in the army, it is bad enough when they are scared on the streets of < HREF="http://jamescleverly.blogspot.com/2008/03/wrong-answer-from-raf.html" REL="nofollow">Peterborough<>.

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