Losing good people

The Defence Select Committee has just told us what we already knew. The huge increase in commitments over the last few years is driving soldiers out of the army.

There will, no doubt, be people who say “well they knew what they were letting themselves in for”. If you feel that please remember these people are not leaving because they don’t want to got to war, they are leaving because they are going to war so often they are not seeing their families any more.

I don’t expect the government keeps figures on divorce rates amongst soldiers but I would bet my life savings that there has been a sharp increase over the last few years.

4 responses to “Losing good people

  1. It’s not only the increase in committments – its the feeling that a) the Government doesn’t value them so doesn’t give them the tools for the job and b) the public to a large extent couldn’t car less. Both positions are very very wrong.

  2. It’s not only the increase in committments – its the feeling that a) the Government doesn’t value them so doesn’t give them the tools for the job and b) the public to a large extent couldn’t car less. Both positions are very very wrong.

  3. I’m amazed that anybody can be so shortsighted as to believe that any of this is a new problem. Soldiers have always been used as ‘cannon fodder’ and the phrase poor bloody infantry has been around for decades or perhaps centuries. Today’s soldiers are waging battles with some of the most up-to-date technology, best rations and best body armour ever to have existed. And they are fighting some of the least well equipped armies in the last hundred years. The American army, who are clearly better armed and better respected by their country, receive more casualties than the British, partly because they are not afraid to go into the hardest places, and partly because no matter how much technology you have you cannot have a safe war.I wonder how morale was in the last war that lasted more than 5 years, the second world war. Then soldiers got on and did their job and nobody complained about low morale. Of course we did have Churchill to motivate the troops rather than the Browne Clowns.The real people to suffer are not our troops or those on the other side, but the civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan – soldiers and ex-soldiers to a large extent couldn’t care less. I wonder how morale is on the streets on Baghdad?

  4. I’m amazed that anybody can be so shortsighted as to believe that any of this is a new problem. Soldiers have always been used as ‘cannon fodder’ and the phrase poor bloody infantry has been around for decades or perhaps centuries. Today’s soldiers are waging battles with some of the most up-to-date technology, best rations and best body armour ever to have existed. And they are fighting some of the least well equipped armies in the last hundred years. The American army, who are clearly better armed and better respected by their country, receive more casualties than the British, partly because they are not afraid to go into the hardest places, and partly because no matter how much technology you have you cannot have a safe war.I wonder how morale was in the last war that lasted more than 5 years, the second world war. Then soldiers got on and did their job and nobody complained about low morale. Of course we did have Churchill to motivate the troops rather than the Browne Clowns.The real people to suffer are not our troops or those on the other side, but the civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan – soldiers and ex-soldiers to a large extent couldn’t care less. I wonder how morale is on the streets on Baghdad?

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