Saying sorry would be a good start

The chronic shortage of key military equipment is a huge issue. I heard stories from TA soldiers deployed to Iraq after being told that kit deficiencies would be “sorted in theatre” and getting to Kuwait to be told that the should have “sorted it out in Chilwell”. The buck cannot stop anywhere other with the Secretary of State for Defence.

The Government has abused the British Army’s “can do” attitude and asked them to do difficult jobs, in hostile environments against highly motivated enemies without the tools to do the job.

Sgt Roberts was killed because of equipment shortages but there are hundreds of soldiers who have had to deal with the fear of stepping out from behind cover not confident that their weapon will fire. They have had to drive along streets knowing their vehicles cannot protect them from a roadside bomb. They are working in small groups dispersed over large areas with radios that habitually don’t work.

These soldiers need to be apologised to as well, when they wake up sweating and screaming because the Army’s psychological support is overstretched apologise to them then too.

The armed forces are being asked to do more and more and more with less and less and less. Conflict costs lives, but to waste lives like that of Sgt Roberts is inexcusable.

12 responses to “Saying sorry would be a good start

  1. It would be pretty vile to play politics over this sort of thing but behind this story, behind the military’s perilous situation stands a man who has starved the forces of money, who openly dislikes the profession and who clearly derides its past, present and future.

    He is also the man who would be Prime Minister, and the Tories could do worse than to remind the Sun’s readers at any and every opportunity.

    It is about time Mr Brown suffered a little of the pain and suffering he has inflicted on those brave enough to do his Government’s bidding.

  2. It would be pretty vile to play politics over this sort of thing but behind this story, behind the military’s perilous situation stands a man who has starved the forces of money, who openly dislikes the profession and who clearly derides its past, present and future.

    He is also the man who would be Prime Minister, and the Tories could do worse than to remind the Sun’s readers at any and every opportunity.

    It is about time Mr Brown suffered a little of the pain and suffering he has inflicted on those brave enough to do his Government’s bidding.

  3. Saying sorry is not nearly enough!Hoon should pilloried everyday (as Byers was) until this miserable little mans life is made such a misery that departs to the obscurity his utterly dishonourable behaviour deserves.

  4. Saying sorry is not nearly enough!Hoon should pilloried everyday (as Byers was) until this miserable little mans life is made such a misery that departs to the obscurity his utterly dishonourable behaviour deserves.

  5. At some point, two options would have been put to Geoff Hoon. These were

    A. To put in the purchase requisitions we needed, and possibly telegraph our intentions to go to war readiness status.

    B. To delay until the final moment in order to keep our intentions secret.

    The consideration in taking option 2 should be that some capabilities will be lost due to lack of equipment available “on the day”, and even that some lives may be lost. This is a valid option if the decision will save MORE lives through the element of surprise gained. THIS WAS CLEARLY NOT THE REASON THAT OPTION 2 WAS TAKEN! Geoff Hoon (and presumably the inner circle in government) wanted to keep the information, not from the enemy, but from their own backbenchers!

    http://www.stcrispinsday.com/

  6. At some point, two options would have been put to Geoff Hoon. These were

    A. To put in the purchase requisitions we needed, and possibly telegraph our intentions to go to war readiness status.

    B. To delay until the final moment in order to keep our intentions secret.

    The consideration in taking option 2 should be that some capabilities will be lost due to lack of equipment available “on the day”, and even that some lives may be lost. This is a valid option if the decision will save MORE lives through the element of surprise gained. THIS WAS CLEARLY NOT THE REASON THAT OPTION 2 WAS TAKEN! Geoff Hoon (and presumably the inner circle in government) wanted to keep the information, not from the enemy, but from their own backbenchers!

    http://www.stcrispinsday.com/

  7. Sorry, I couldn’t keep this secret any longer!
    Mr Hoon visited us in Basra in 2004. He didn’t have the decency to stay awake whilst he was briefed by the Chief of Staff and Commander of the 1st Mechanised Brigade. He actually dozed off in the front row! Makes you wonder if he was asleep when given the choices regarding procurement prior to Telic 1?

  8. Sorry, I couldn’t keep this secret any longer!
    Mr Hoon visited us in Basra in 2004. He didn’t have the decency to stay awake whilst he was briefed by the Chief of Staff and Commander of the 1st Mechanised Brigade. He actually dozed off in the front row! Makes you wonder if he was asleep when given the choices regarding procurement prior to Telic 1?

  9. Don’t blame Mr. Hoon. He is a mere bit player in this. You need to look at the bigger fish. Here’s an extract from a soon-to-be-published essay by Mick Greenhough:

    “Under the 1998 St Malo Agreement and the EU Amsterdam Treaty, signed by Tony Blair in 1999, British military forces are implicitly committed to the EU – as a small, virtual force initially but what of the future?
    The fact remains that to comply with the European Union Agenda there cannot be collections of regions (such as the UK) maintaining their own armed forces. The only option is the single EU armed force.

    The ultimate conclusion is that the British Armed forces will, sooner or later, be handed over lock, stock and barrel (including our nuclear arm) to an EU armed force.

    It’s worth a quote here from Romano Prodi, when he was President of the European Commission – “When I was talking about the European army I was not joking. If you don’t want to call it a European army, don’t call it a European army. You can call it “Margaret,” you can call it “Mary-Ann,” (Electronic Telegraph 4/2/00). And one from the German ambassador to the EU, Wilhelm Schönfelder – Handelsblatt, 19th April 2005
    “I am sure that in medium-term we will have a European army financed by the EU budget”. As far as the EU is concerned there will be an EU Army and only an EU Army.

    UK military communications are now being integrated into the EU Galileo satellite spying system – thus making our military unable to communicate with US GPS and their armed forces. Galileo will be able to locate any individual with a micro-chipped ID card to within three feet and is 20% owned by Communist China. New Labour continues to insist that Galileo has no military potential.

    In essence, the EU and the Labour government are moving us away from our traditional alliance with the USA into a military future where we may find ourselves in opposition to them, whether directly or by proxy – without any debate in parliament. The quiet transference of UK military production facilities to Europe is already taking place.

    Again, as the EU constitution was rejected by France and Holland, the EU military force has as yet no legal status. They are preparing for it anyway.”

    And you thought the dismantling of old regiments under Sir Mike Jackson was just an accounting exercise? I’m afraid there’s worse to come…

  10. Don’t blame Mr. Hoon. He is a mere bit player in this. You need to look at the bigger fish. Here’s an extract from a soon-to-be-published essay by Mick Greenhough:

    “Under the 1998 St Malo Agreement and the EU Amsterdam Treaty, signed by Tony Blair in 1999, British military forces are implicitly committed to the EU – as a small, virtual force initially but what of the future?
    The fact remains that to comply with the European Union Agenda there cannot be collections of regions (such as the UK) maintaining their own armed forces. The only option is the single EU armed force.

    The ultimate conclusion is that the British Armed forces will, sooner or later, be handed over lock, stock and barrel (including our nuclear arm) to an EU armed force.

    It’s worth a quote here from Romano Prodi, when he was President of the European Commission – “When I was talking about the European army I was not joking. If you don’t want to call it a European army, don’t call it a European army. You can call it “Margaret,” you can call it “Mary-Ann,” (Electronic Telegraph 4/2/00). And one from the German ambassador to the EU, Wilhelm Schönfelder – Handelsblatt, 19th April 2005
    “I am sure that in medium-term we will have a European army financed by the EU budget”. As far as the EU is concerned there will be an EU Army and only an EU Army.

    UK military communications are now being integrated into the EU Galileo satellite spying system – thus making our military unable to communicate with US GPS and their armed forces. Galileo will be able to locate any individual with a micro-chipped ID card to within three feet and is 20% owned by Communist China. New Labour continues to insist that Galileo has no military potential.

    In essence, the EU and the Labour government are moving us away from our traditional alliance with the USA into a military future where we may find ourselves in opposition to them, whether directly or by proxy – without any debate in parliament. The quiet transference of UK military production facilities to Europe is already taking place.

    Again, as the EU constitution was rejected by France and Holland, the EU military force has as yet no legal status. They are preparing for it anyway.”

    And you thought the dismantling of old regiments under Sir Mike Jackson was just an accounting exercise? I’m afraid there’s worse to come…

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