Brown doesn’t run the economy, he taxes it

I get a bit annoyed when people say, “Gordon Brown has run the economy well”. No Chancellor, however good, runs the economy! They can affect the economy but not run it.

The economy is also blown around by forces such as the weather, wars, economies of other nations and a whole host of other factors out of any one person’s control.

So what has Gordon done? He has put up taxes, 80 times, are here they are.
1997
1. Council tax increased by 6.5pc
2. Mortgage tax relief cut
3. Pensions tax
4. Health insurance taxed
5. Health insurance taxed again
6. Fuel tax escalator up
7. Vehicle excise duty up
8. Tobacco duty escalator up
9. Stamp duty up for properties over £250,000
10. Corporation tax changes
11. New windfall tax on utilities

1998
12. Married couples’ allowance cut
13. Tax on travel insurance up
14. Tax on casinos and gaming machines up
15. Fuel tax escalator brought forward
16. Tax on company cars up
17. Tax relief for foreign earnings abolished
18. Tax concession for certain professions abolished
19. Capital gains tax imposed on certain non-residents
20. Reinvestment relief restricted
21. Corporation tax payments brought forward
22 Higher stamp duty rates up
23. Some hydrocarbon duties up
24. Additional diesel duties
25. Landfill tax up
26. Council tax up by 8.6pc

1999
27. NIC earnings limit raised
28. NICs for self-employed up
29. Married couples’ allowance abolished
30. Mortgage tax relief abolished
31. IR35: Taxation of personal services companies
32. Company car business mileage allowances restricted
33. Tobacco duty escalator brought forward
34. Insurance premium tax up
35. Vocational training relief abolished
36. Employer NICs extended to all benefits in kind
37. VAT on some banking services up
38. Premiums paid to tenants by landlords taxed
39. Duty on minor oils up
40. Vehicle excise duties for lorries up
41. Landfill tax escalator introduced
42. Higher rates of stamp duty up again
43. Council tax up by 6.8pc

2000
44. Tobacco duties up
45. Higher rates of stamp duty up again
46. Extra taxation of life assurance companies
47. Rules on controlled foreign companies extended
48. Council tax up by 6.1pc

2001
49. Council tax up by 6.4pc

2002
50. Personal allowances frozen
51. National Insurance threshold frozen
52. NICs for employers up
53. NICs for employees up
54. NICs for self-employed up
55. North Sea taxation up
56. Tax on some alcoholic drinks up
57. New stamp duty regime
58. New rules on loan relationships
59. Council tax up by 8.2pc

2003
60. VAT on electronically supplied services
61. IR35 applied to domestic workers
62. Betting duty change
63. Tax on red diesel and fuel oil up
64. Controlled foreign companies measures on Ireland
65. Vehicle excise duty up
66. Council tax up by 12.9pc

2004
67. New 19pc tax rate for owner-managed businesses
68. New tax on private use of company vans
69. UK transfer pricing introduced
70. Increase in rate of tax on trusts
71. Increase in tax on red diesel fuel
72. Increase in tax on other road fuels (including LPG)
73. Council tax up by 5.9pc

2005
74. Cancellation of stamp duty land tax relief for disadvantaged areas.
75. North Sea taxation doubled from 10pc to 20pc.
76. Zero per cent rate of corporation tax abolished
77. Council tax up by 4.1pc

2006
78. Clampdown on trusts and insurance policies commonly used to mitigate inheritance tax.
79. Increase in vehicle excise duty for SUVs.
80. Council tax up by 4.5pc

6 responses to “Brown doesn’t run the economy, he taxes it

  1. The Council tax (Poll Tax?) rises are the ones that get to me most. Way above inflation, and mostly raised to cover the overly generous employment / pension contracts of council employees who, on the whole, are the 2nd eleven of the employed class (I have worked in local gov, so speak from experience).

  2. The Council tax (Poll Tax?) rises are the ones that get to me most. Way above inflation, and mostly raised to cover the overly generous employment / pension contracts of council employees who, on the whole, are the 2nd eleven of the employed class (I have worked in local gov, so speak from experience).

  3. To be fair to him (which hurts) he has brought in more tax cuts that tax rises. However ……..Christine Frayne, economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies says “Although there may have been a greater number of tax cuts than rises, their magnitude is such that the net result is a tax increase.” and “The tax burden is demonstrably higher than it was in 1997/98.”Also Professor Peter Spencer, chief economist at the Ernst & Young Item Club, said stealth taxes were extremely damaging. “A thousand pounds less here, a thousand pounds there – it all adds up.” He also said the tax-credits system that replaced some tax reliefs had already proved itself to be “an absurdity”.

  4. To be fair to him (which hurts) he has brought in more tax cuts that tax rises. However ……..Christine Frayne, economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies says “Although there may have been a greater number of tax cuts than rises, their magnitude is such that the net result is a tax increase.” and “The tax burden is demonstrably higher than it was in 1997/98.”Also Professor Peter Spencer, chief economist at the Ernst & Young Item Club, said stealth taxes were extremely damaging. “A thousand pounds less here, a thousand pounds there – it all adds up.” He also said the tax-credits system that replaced some tax reliefs had already proved itself to be “an absurdity”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s