Not a sport for softies


I used to play as a number 8 at Blackheath Rugby Club. I got a range of injuries over the years, a dislocated clavicle, a broken finger, twisted ankle, and a range of cuts and bruises. I chose to play the game and injuries were part of that choice.

I understand that steps must be taken to prevent unnecessary harm but we cannot avoid all danger in life, it would create a life not worth living. Rugby is a tough came, if you are a bit soft I recommend you play in the backs, if you are very soft indeed try football, or tiddly-winks (although those counters can take your eye out!).

6 responses to “Not a sport for softies

  1. Did you see the excellent letter in the Telegraph today on this very subject? I think you can still read it < HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?menuId=1588&menuItemId=-1&view=DISPLAYCONTENT&grid=P8&targetRule=0#head3" REL="nofollow">here<>.If the link has changed, then here is the text:“<>Sir – Playing prop forward for Oundle School 45 years ago at the age of 17, I suffered damage resulting in admission to the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore, a bone graft to my lower back and the loss of two discs. I spent three months in a head-to-toe plaster cast, a further month in hospital, then six months wearing a steel corset. My school career ended prematurely, my A-level courses had to be abandoned and my sporting activities were severely curtailed.Should the scrum be abolished in its present form (report, May 26)? No: it is an essential part of a fine game. The number of accidents strikes me as minimal in relation to the popularity of rugby. In any case, surgical procedures are thankfully now much improved.If the rugby scrum is seen as too risky, then what about other ‘dangerous’ sports? A visit to the local point-to-point horse races reveals the large number of people reduced to a wheelchair by riding accidents; a visit to the ski slopes evidences the high risk of injury from that splendid sport.<>” – Crombie Glennie, Hawksworth, Notts

  2. Did you see the excellent letter in the Telegraph today on this very subject? I think you can still read it < HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?menuId=1588&menuItemId=-1&view=DISPLAYCONTENT&grid=P8&targetRule=0#head3" REL="nofollow">here<>.If the link has changed, then here is the text:“<>Sir – Playing prop forward for Oundle School 45 years ago at the age of 17, I suffered damage resulting in admission to the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore, a bone graft to my lower back and the loss of two discs. I spent three months in a head-to-toe plaster cast, a further month in hospital, then six months wearing a steel corset. My school career ended prematurely, my A-level courses had to be abandoned and my sporting activities were severely curtailed.Should the scrum be abolished in its present form (report, May 26)? No: it is an essential part of a fine game. The number of accidents strikes me as minimal in relation to the popularity of rugby. In any case, surgical procedures are thankfully now much improved.If the rugby scrum is seen as too risky, then what about other ‘dangerous’ sports? A visit to the local point-to-point horse races reveals the large number of people reduced to a wheelchair by riding accidents; a visit to the ski slopes evidences the high risk of injury from that splendid sport.<>” – Crombie Glennie, Hawksworth, Notts

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